The Buddha

asylum-art:

Captive Landscapes - Daniel Kukla

Daniel Kukla, the Brooklyn-based photographer, photographed the interiors of animal enclosure at 15 different zoos across the US and Europe. He says in his Artist Statement: “We, as humans, go to great lengths to satisfy our desire for a connection with the natural world, especially in our interactions with wild and exotic animals. Zoos are the primary site for this relationship, but they often obscure the conflicts inherent in maintaining and displaying captive wild animals.” Inviting the viewer to question the role of constructed habitats, these images explore the motivations behind controlling the natural world.

via I need a guide

illbeoutback:

If you’re protesting abortion, the Supreme Court says you can get right in women’s faces and scream at them on their way into the clinic. Because freedom of speech.

But if you try and protest the murder of a black man, you get tear gas fired at you.

(via fightingforanimals)

deliciousdimension:

(In)Visible by Kirsten Berg at Burning Man 2014

via : https://counterform.exposure.co/burningman

red-lipstick:

Pat Perry (MI, USA) - Seasonless, 2014      Ink, Pencils, Digital (Commission for Reef.)

mango-popsicle:

SPAIN: TYPOGRAPHIC DESIGN: MUOKKAA STUDIO

Muokkaa is graphic designer Alejandro López Becerro. View this project, 36 Days of Type and more on his website.

minkpole:

miss-nin-pinup:

enzuigiri:

The rarest of the rare: a men’s magazine advocating hairy armpits on women.

. It’s not embracing a lady nature, it attracts body odour

Arm pit hair has absolutely nothing to do with body odour. Shaving will not decrease your body odour, and not shaving will not increase it. I haven’t shaved my arm pits in almost a year and I don’t wear deodorant, and I hardly have any body odour. Stop being ashamed and disgusted by your own body. 

(Source: monodoh, via fightingforanimals)

martincopertari:

That place called “Tower Cluster” (detail)

2012

(via kale-seitan)

generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.

(via thisisjaclyne)

asylum-art:

Dreamy photos with a story by Robby Cavanaugh

Artist onTumblr |Facebook |500px |on deviantART |Instagram |Flickr

The artist I want to introduce you to today, Robby Cavanaugh, isn’t only good with a camera, he also has a way with words. A snippet from a statement considering his work on his website:

“I edit my photographs to closely match the images in my mind, creating specific tones that match the feelings I wish to imbue in the viewer. My work requires intense planning and problem solving, but no matter how impossible a concept may seem, I never let it limit my ability to express the story I need to tell.”

(via asylum-art)

alcrego:

Pink Floyd - The Wall

Motion Music Cover #6

(via turecepcja)

heaveninawildflower:

Lavatera olbia (Mediterranean Mallow) by Pierre Joseph Redouté (1759-1840).

Image and text courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

heaveninawildflower:

'Pattern in Blue' (about 1923) by Nelly Littlehale Murphy (1867–1941).

Watercolour and graphite.

Image and text courtesy MFA Boston.